About 66assuranceway

I am a mid-life Christian writer who enjoys sharing ENCOURAGING Scripture, Music, & Insights with others. Spiritual EMPOWERMENT is I believe at the root of living a fruitful Christian life. The many assurances provided to Christians are richly described in the Bible's 66 books.

Christian Assurance: Putting it ‘All In His Hands’

This and that, I put it all in His hands,

He can handle it that’s a fact, I put it all in His hands”.

~ Varn Michael McKay, “All in His Hands”


At it’s core, the assurance that Christians have lies in our ability to know we can put our lives in his (God’s) hands. The vision and name of this blog, 66 Assurance Way, rests in Christian assurance and the sixty-six books of the Holy Bible.  There are I feel 9 pillars of Christian Assurance.  

“All in His Hands”, written by Varn Michael McKay, entered by spirit a couple of weeks ago – and lingered.   First recorded by Dr. Charles Hayes & The Cosmopolitan Choir, featured on their release “Turn It Over to Jesus” (1989), it has a simple and divinely joyful nature that I love!  It seemed fitting for the third anniversary Series I started last month.

  • The anointed Gospel video (First Baptist Church of Glenarden Combined Choir, Landover MD) and uplifting words (lyrics below) each stand on their own. The Baltimore choir’s video is phenomenal!   
  • Remember: If you have a burden, problem, or question, you can put it in his hands. Turn it over to Jesus!  What can he handle?  ‘This and that’.   Yes, this and that.  

All In His Hands

Verse 1
All in His hands,
I put it all in His hands.
(repeat)
All of my burdens, problems
if I have a question;

Chorus
I put it all,
yes, I put it all;
I put it all in His hands.

Verse 2
Whatever the problem,
I put it all in His hands.
I know that He can solve them,
I put it all in His hands.

Verse 3
This and that,
I put it all in His hands,
He can handle it that’s a fact,
I put it all in His hands.

Bridge
No matter how great or small
He’s the Master of them all

Chorus


 Greg Silverthorne

66 Assurance Way

Christians: Be ‘Unsilent’ About Things That Really Matter (2016 Election)

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.

Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, JR

 


In the 3 days following the 2016 Election, 3 NBA Coaches offered heart-felt statements that I found to be timely and vividly-expressive – and that I agree with.  While I can’t say that any of them are Christians, all three seem to be morally-grounded men.  While one of them is known to speak from time to time on social issues (Steve Kerr), the other two (Stan Van Gundy and Gregg Popovich) aren’t – but were refreshingly frank and fervent in their Election week remarks.  With the Inaugeration of the 45th President Friday, today seemed a good time to share what they said in the aftermath of the Elections.

When juxtaposed against Rev. Noah Van Niel’s Sermon five days after the Election featured in Sermon Says: Hopefulness, God’s Presence, & Racial Harmony, I think these four men offer an enlightening perspective on the last eleven weeks in this country.

Excerpts of the coaches’ statements, emphasis added, are provided below.

  • Stan Van Gundy, Coach, Detroit Pistons

  • Steve Kerr. Coach, Golden State Warriors

  • Gregg Popovich, Coach, San Antonio Spurs

 


Stan Van Gundy

  • You read how [Trump] was embraced by conservative Christians. Evangelical Christians. I’m not a religious guy, but what the hell Bible are they reading? I’m dead serious. What Bible are you reading? And you’re supposed to be — it’s different. There are a lot of different groups we can be upset at. But you’re Christians. You’re supposed to be — at least you pride yourself on being the moral compass of our society. And you said, ‘Yeah, the guy can talk about women like that. I’m fine with that.’ He can disparage every ethnic group, and I’m fine with that”.
  • Martin Luther King said, ‘The arc of the moral universe is long, but bends toward justice.’  I would have believed in that for a long time, but not today. … What we have done to minorities … in this election is despicable. I’m having a hard time dealing with it”.
  • I have been ashamed of a lot of things that have happened in this country, but I can’t say I’ve ever been ashamed of our country until today. Until today. We all have to find our way to move forward, but that was — and I’m not even trying to make a political statement. To me, that’s beyond politics”.
  • I didn’t vote for (George W.) Bush, but he was a good, honorable man with whom I had political differences, so I didn’t vote for him. But for our country to be where we are now, who took a guy who — I don’t care what anyone says, I’m sure they have other reasons and maybe good reasons for voting for Donald Trump — but I don’t think anybody can deny this guy is openly and brazenly racist and misogynistic and ethnic-centric, and say, ‘That’s OK with us, we’re going to vote for him anyway.’  We have just thrown a good part of our population under the bus, and I have problems with thinking that this is where we are as a country”.

Steve Kerr

  • “I thought it took a lot of guts for Stan [Van Gundy] to say what he did and I think a lot of us feel similarly,” Kerr said.  For me, probably the biggest disappointment with this election was the level of discourse. There should be some level of decorum and respect and dignity that goes with the election. And it was like [that] went out the window. Maybe we should have seen it coming over the last 10 years . . . And I guess it was only a matter of time before it spilled into politics, but then you’re faced with the reality that the man who’s going to lead you has routinely used racist, misogynist, insulting words. That’s a tough one. That’s a tough one. I wish him well”.
  • I don’t know what else to say. It’s just the whole process has left all of us I think feeling just kind of disgusted and disappointed.  I thought we were better than this.  I thought the Jerry Springer Show was the Jerry Springer Show”.

Gregg Popovich

  • Right now I’m just trying to formulate thoughts. It’s still early and I’m still sick to my stomach.  Not basically because the Republicans won or anything, but the disgusting tenor and tone and all the comments that have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic, and I live in that country where half the country ignored all that to elect someone. That’s the scariest part of the whole thing to me”.
  • We live in a country that ignored all those values that we would hold our kids accountable for. They’d be grounded for years if they acted and said the things that have been said in that campaign by Donald Trump. I look at the evangelicals and I wonder, ‘Those values don’t mean anything to them?’ All those values to me are more important than anybody’s skill in business or anything else because it tells who we are and how we want to live and what kind of people we are.
  • We didn’t make this stuff up. [Trump’s] angry at the media because they reported what he said and how he acted.  It’s ironic to me.  It just makes no sense.  So that’s my real fear and that’s what gives me so much pause and makes me feel so badly that the country is willing to be that intolerant and not understand the empathy that’s necessary to understand other group situations. “I’m a rich white guy, and I’m sick to my stomach thinking about it. I can’t imagine being a Muslim right now, or a woman, or an African-American, a Hispanic, a handicapped person, how disenfranchised they might feel . . . The race baiting with trying to make Barack Obama, our first black president, illegitimate. It leaves me wondering where I’ve been living and with whom I’m living”.

Links to their statements:

Detroit Pistons’ Stan Van Gundy goes off on Trump: ‘Brazenly racist’ (audio and transcript)

Gregg Popovich uncensored: Full transcript of thoughts on Donald Trump (audio and transcript)

Steve Kerr on election of Donald Trump: ‘I thought we were better than this’ (transcript)


While Steve Kerr’s was the most diplomatic of the three, they all show the profound power of being unsilent – i.e. speaking up when situation warrants!  While you may not be as prominent as a NBA coach, your refusal to be silent ‘about the things that matter’ is a good thing too. 

As Kerr stated “There should be some level of decorum and respect and dignity that goes with the election”.   When he thought the mood of his players the day after Elections was due to a game his team had just lost, Van Gundy quickly learned – from one of the basketball players- that it was about who’d won the Elections that was causing them to feel the way they felt.  Neither Popovich or Van Gundy felt like talking about the games their teams had just played after making their statements to the reporters. 

As a Christian, being unsilent means, among other things, casting your vote in elections – and being willing to speak up when the outcome is one you find morally troublesome.  Many, including these three NBA coaches and myself, feel this is such an election.  If I didn’t, I wouldn’t have posted on 66 Assurance Way on a topic I typically have avoided: Politics.  Regardless of who’s in the Oval Office, remember the one who sits high and looks low.  The Lord is our Shepherd!

To God be the glory.

 Greg Silverthorne, 66 Assurance Way

She’s Got the Anointing, They Got the Word: Mosie Burks

mosie-burks


She’s got the anointing, they got the word!  As I watched and kept rewatching this powerful video, “They Got the Word”, I wasn’t quite sure why I kept being drawn to do so.  Over and over again.  

  • The amazing energy of the truly anointed lead singer? (Indisputably anointed, Mosie Burks‘ gray hair suggests she wasn’t ‘born last night’/Smile)
  • The power of the fully-robed choir of gifted men and woman she led? (Mississippi Mass Choir)
  • The gospel song’s skillful leveraging of a scripture I didn’t know well? (Revelations 21, the second to last book in the Holy Bible)

Likely all of the above I’d say. Last July, a few months before the 3rd Anniversary of this blog (Sept. 21, 2016), I learned more about the talented choir – and the lead singer of this spirited song. This post seemed a good one to begin the Anniversary Series I promised in September.


Mosie Burks’ dynamism and anointed spirit are a joy to watch in this video! Frankly, she exhibits energy and moves that you’d expect from a woman twenty years her junior.  She was about 66 or 67 when this video of the 1999-released song was recorded.  As of July 2014 she was STILL touring with the Mississippi Mass Choir. They say a picture is worth a thousand words.  If you watch this video, I promise you’ll be amazed at how she makes this song come alive.  When she retired from her former job, as a telephone operator (South Central Bell after 23 years) who knew she’d be answering another kind of call?  I’m so glad she did.

If you look at the tag cloud on my Home Page, you’ll know that I regularly feature gospel music videos and lyrics on this blog. When I realized about four years ago that I couldn’t lead a song if my life depended on it (smile), I had a fellow church member -who is a great singer- encourage me to ‘sing with my keyboard-typed words’ instead.  She knew what my true talents were.  

  • For the record, I made an attempt to lead a song – “Company”/The Nevel Sisters – and it was a mild disaster!  I realized that what I WANTED to sing I couldn’t, and that what I could (reasonably) sing I didn’t want to sing.  Like having a Tercel budget and Lexus desires when car shopping.  I sing harmony, tenor, in the background; that’s a role that’s within my God-given talents.  

How did I come to this song? The choir I’ve sung with for over 7 years (Gospel Choir, Oak Ridge First Baptist Church) sings this song.  It’s one of my favorite. Moreover, the well-produced video is phenomenal!  Looking at Mosie Burks, I subconsciously feel that when God has my back I can do all things. All things! You can too.


Who is Mosie Burks?

  • Long a local singing favorite at churches around Jackson, Miss., she was instead talked into [after retiring] joining the Mississippi Mass Choir and has spent the past two decades traveling the world as the hugely popular ensemble’ s star soloist.”
  • “When she walks on the stage, the audience automatically rises to their feet,” says Jerry Mannery, 62, the choir’s executive director and one of its songwriters. “Whether it’s in the U.S., in Africa, in Spain or in Greece, it doesn’t matter. People just recognize that there is something special about her. The scripture says, ‘Many are called, but few are chosen.’ She’s really chosen.”
  • Burks was the third of 13 children born in Forest, Miss., to migrant-fieldworker parents. Picking cotton didn’t suit her health, however. . . She says she was the only member of the family who attended church. “My mom would wake me,” Burks remembers. “She’d have my little dress pressed and comb my hair, and down through the field I would go.”
  • She got married when she was 21. “Also when Burks was 21, her mother died and her father abandoned the family, leaving her to help raise five of her younger brothers and sisters until they were old enough to go out on their own.  She worked as a maid before being hired by the telephone company.
  • Burks has three children by her first husband, who died in 1984, and seven stepchildren by her second and current husband, Willie Burks.
  • “I still enjoy traveling, even at this status in life,” said Burks in 2014.  “I give God the glory and thanksgiving every day that I am still able to get up and go and do.  It was just beyond my imagination the things the Lord has allowed me to be a part of.  Amen to that.”

Source: “Mosie Burks, Mississippi choir to make Richmond appearance”, Lee Hildebrand, San Francisco Chronicle, July 20, 2014.


mississippi-mass-choir

To see someone render this song with such intensity, at any age, would be impressive. To be in her late 60s when this video was recorded and doing it so wells makes it even more so; at age of 81 (July 2014) Burks was STILL touring with the group.  Through him who strengthens us we can do all things.

In an interview, Burks cited 3 scriptures which serve as sources of divine encouragement for her:


The song, “They Got The Word”, conveys a basic tenet of Christian life: Eternal salvation is possible for all abiding children of God. In life, whatever earthly tribulations we endure are simply temporary. They won’t last. Moreover, heavenly triumphs await us when we go up yonder. For those who pass through the Pearly Gates, as Burks puts it there will be “nothing, nothing, nothing but Peace”. For all who get there they’ll be able to “Crown him, crown him, crown him Lord of Lords” (Refer to Revelations 4 and 14).

When a 57-year old cousin of mine passed away last year, I couldn’t get this Mississippi Mass Choir led by Mosie Burks video out of my mind!  As stated in the 21st Chapter (Verses 4 – 6) of Revelations:

And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful. And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.


Greg Silverthorne

66 Assurance Way


Photo credits: Video screenshots, “They Got The Word“, Pannellctp Traditional Gospel Music.

66 Assurance Way: Pressing towards the Mark in 2017

By Greg Silverthorne

“But allow me to offer a little bit of hope, a reminder of what the soul actually is and how it is constructed and valued. 

It is not external, it is internal.  It is not made, it is given.  It is not earned, it is instilled.  It is not of humanity, it is of God.

And as such, it is not subject to the changing winds of culture or politics.   It is more stable, more lasting, and more resilient than anything else we possess”. [Emphasis added]  

Rev. Noah Van Niel (11/13/2016)


John14As I approached the 3rd anniversary of this blog (Sept 21, 2016), I had envisioned an Anniversary Series beginning in late September – and ending by December 21st.  So much for my grand plans. Smile.

On December 20th I published a post that captured a lot of what had happened on and since the November 8th Elections. “When Hate Arrives, Silence is Tacit Approval” One Man’s Story” was surely an example of faith in action!

The results of the Elections exactly 2 months ago, and many events (good and bad) since then, caused me to postpone the launch of the Series – to mid-January.  The silence is tacit approval post, along with the first post of 2017 (“Sermon Says: Hopefulness, God’s Presence, and Racial Harmony”), are posts I felt deeply called to do.  The young Priest , Rev. Noah Van Niel, featured in the Sermon Says post is a phenomenally eloquent and empathetic man of God!  The words that led this post are from that Sermon by the way.  When I first read the Sermon he delivered -the Sunday after Elections- I was immediately moved . . . and knew I had to share his profound perspective on the soul as a Christian’s stronghold. 

66AssuranceWay blogger


While I’ve written in the last 3+ years on topics beyond spiritual encouragement and Gospel music, like worklife/career issues, I’ve generally avoided blogging on politics.  Notice the tag cloud in the right sidebar. I haven’t done a lot of deep blogging on race issues.  However, the events of the last 2 months, including some enlightening dialogues (and deep self reflection), have been unlike anything I’ve experienced in my 55 ½ years on this planet as an African-American!  As bad as things look at times, I trust that ‘all things will work together for the good’ (Romans 8:28).  I trust that God will keep being a Way Maker, and not forsake me, you, or any abiding Christian.

  • Silver linings?  Yes.  I’ve personally seen, and helped others see, the racial dynamic of the US in a more nuanced way.   As well I’ve seen some extraordinary actions that caused me to NOT loss faith in humanity; my faith in God remains changed!  So, in the words of the late Maya Angelou, I will -from time to time- be a ‘trailing wisp of glory’ in shining light on a dark place in America – race relations.  I have accepted your assignment God!

That said, I will continue to blog about Christian assurance, gospel music, worklife issues, and spiritual encouragement & empowerment.

  • I will publish a post that I first envisioned just after Labor Day next weekend.  The story behind a lead singer for the Mississippi Mass Choir (Mosie Burks) is one I love!  Like Tiffany Joy (singing “Amazing” with Ricky Dillard), Burks is an anointed singer with an intriguing life story.

Greg Silverthorne, 66 Assurance Way

Sermon Says: Hopefulness, God’s Presence, & Racial Harmony

If you lose hope, somehow you lose that vitality

that keeps life moving, you lose that courage to be.”

Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

6287240997_53ff1460da_z_heartbible_honorbound_flickr



Keeping the Courage to Be: Your Hopes, Your Dreams

Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

I am personally the victim of deferred dreams, of blasted hopes, but in spite of that . . . I still have a dream, because, you know, you can’t give up in life. If you lose hope, somehow you lose that vitality that keeps life moving, you lose that courage to be, that quality that helps you go on in spite of all. And so today I still have a dream. I have a dream that one day men will rise up and come to see that they are made to live together as brothers”. [Emphasis added]

These words are from the last Christmas Sermon (December 1967) that King delivered, prior to his assassination in 1968. The importance of having hope and having dreams are expressed in this sermon by the embattled civil rights leader.   Racial harmony is based in all people really ‘living together as brothers’.   Therefore, simply uttering the word Unity in a single speech doesn’t mean that a diverse, divided country is magically transformed!  In the 1960s, when I was a young child living in New York, or now.

Sadly, in 2017, nearly fifty years after the death of MLK from an assassin’s bullet, we’re still a nation that judges people too often on their color – not their character.   Men of God like the other man who I showcase in this post, Rev. Noah Van Niel, give me hope that MLK’s dream is still possible.  A deferred dream, not an impossible dream.  

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Your Soul: A Stronghold Against Hate and Fear

Rev. Noah Van Niel

But allow me to offer a little bit of hope, a reminder of what the soul actually is and how it is constructed and valued. It is not external, it is internal. It is not made, it is given. It is not earned, it is instilled. It is not of humanity, it is of God. And as such, it is not subject to the changing winds of culture or politics. It is more stable, more lasting, and more resilient than anything else we possess. Our lives are liable to be molded and shaped by all sorts of forces beyond our control. But our soul—that bit of God that resides in each of us—is unchanging in that it is always pure, and righteous and good and it is always there no matter how much hatred, or anger, or worry, or fear is piled on top of it. And it will, always, have the last word”. [Emphasis added]

In that God has the final say, your soul will have “the last word”.  Period.  End of discussion.  This powerful Sermon was delivered on the Sunday after the recent Elections (11/13/16) by Rev. Van Niel.  I thank my friend Thomas, who I profiled in “When Hate Arises, Silence is Tacit Approval: One Man’s Story, for bringing this Sermon to my attention.  I’ve personally thanked Rev. Van Niel for delivering a message I, and many others, needed to hear!

The eloquence and empathy of this young, white Priest was one of the most calming things I experienced in the days after the candidate I didn’t vote for won.  To this fifty-something Black man in NC (yes, NC . . . Pray for me!), God knew I needed something compelling, spiritual, and anointed to deal with the changes I was enduring.  Reflecting on this Priest’s words was part of my own post-election strategy to not loss hope – when the candidate I voted for lost (in the Electoral College).  

God’s presence in our souls is something no Christian should take for granted.  Your soul is a stronghold like no other!


82834289_25db4ef0d4_z_LightCross_daveking


Strategies for Dealing with Life’s Storms

Leslie Vernick

The sermons of Dr. King and Rev. Van Niel serve as a foundation for the insightful strategies which Leslie Vernick offers.   In times of disappointment and discouragement, even the most abiding Christians may feel like they can’t go on.  Sermons, without specific coping strategies, may not have had the impact the Lord desired for this post today – my first in 2017.   

In “5 Ways to Stop Discouragement from Getting the Best of You” Vernick offers some spiritual steps that you can take when facing disappointment.   They are in my humble Christian opinion a very good complement to the pulpit-delivered words of King and Van Niel.   

  • After offering four ways that abiding Christians can be discouraged, Vernick offers “five (5) steps you can take when you start to feel the black cloud of discouragement swallow you up“.   With ‘the God in you’ that is your soul, with ‘that courage to be’, and your dreams, you CAN deal with tough times like a champion.  You can go on!   The steps, described poignantly in her article, are:

1. Be honest.

2. Take care of your body.

3. Pay attention to your thought life.

4. Train yourself to “see” life out of two lenses at the same time

5. Press close into God


Link to full Sermons:

 


Our soul—that bit of God that resides in each of us— is

unchanging . . . and good and it is always there no matter how much

hatred, or anger, or worry, or fear is piled on top of it”.

Rev. Noah Van Niel



Photo credits:

Bible – honorbound/fickr  (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson & Rev. King – U.S. Embassy New Delhi/flickr  (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Cross – Dave King/flickr  (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

When Hate Arises, Silence is Tacit Approval: One Man’s Story

If you are neutral in situations of injustice,

you have chosen the side of the oppressor.”

Desmond Tutu

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Watching the election results 8 years ago (2008) with my smiling, 76-year old father, seeing the election of the first Black U.S. President together, was a day I remember very fondly. Watching last month’s Elections (2016), given the character, campaign behavior, and temperament (alone) of the man who won, I was quite disgusted.  A 180 degree difference in my emotional reaction to two Presidential elections.

Unbeknownst to me, a 55-year old African-American man (Greensboro NC), a white, Boston friend of mind was in Atlanta on business on November 8th. Thomas, a friend and classmate (Brown University), was clearly -based on our text message exchanges- as disgusted with the outcome as I was!  However, those at the Georgia bar beside him on Election Night were elated – and engaged in a hate-laden celebration. The story he later shared with me, 4 days after the Election, is one I felt I needed to share with others.


He watched the election results while he was having dinner at a hotel bar in Atlanta GA. He was sitting in a room filled with Trump enthusiasts who were getting increasingly drunk, loud, and hateful (words) as it became increasingly more apparent that the man they’d backed, not Hillary Rodham Clinton, would win. The loud men in the bar weren’t locals, but out of towners from places like Texas attending a conference.

Finally the guy sitting next to Thomas, who was tall and ‘built like a retired football lineman’ my friend said, crossed the line, saying racist and misogynist things he felt he could NOT tolerate.  Some of the man’s fiery rage he told me was directed at First Lady Michelle Obama.  By the way, the married father of two would never be mistaken for a football player . . . or a NBA player for that matter.

They got into a pretty heated verbal exchange when my friend could not remain silent any longer.  He told me:

He asked me where I was from and I told him Boston, where we judge people by the content of their character not the color of their skin, their religion, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or sexual orientation.

In response to this he then yelled out “we have ourselves here a Yankee liberal”.  I ‘dressed him and all other Trump supporters down’ by calling them out for looking the other way on the hateful things which [the Republican nominee] had done; I rattled off a large number of hateful things that Trump had said or done. I told him my issue was less with Trump and more with his followers “like you” who now feel entitled to speak hatefully, as he had been doing for the previous 5 minutes.

Thomas was eventually able to end his verbal exchange with the ranting man without getting into a physical fight.

My friend went on to tell me later:

I had my chance to let off steam by calling out xenophobia, misogyny and racism. The hateful rhetoric then ceased.  I had made a bit of a scene so I went over and apologized, not for what I said, but apologized if I had caused her any problems with my making a scene.  The hotel manager pulled me aside . . . She said that she appreciated my calling him out and ending the hurt. The young black woman said that I represented her entire staff, who were all minorities except one white man.  Some of whom were in tears when the room of white Trump supporters started saying hateful things.

The hotel manager appreciated what he’d just done.  She actually gave Thomas a complimentary room upgrade to an executive suite.  Seems like, for this Good Samaritan, there was a better ‘room at the inn’ for his getting in the rowdy, hateful man’s face.

Frankly, I was impressed with what my friend chose to do that night. He risked getting hit or injured, or perhaps having to hit the man!  One of them could have left there ‘horizontal’ – for a trip to a hospital emergency room!  When I asked him about his motivations to do what he did, he stated:

While I will try my hardest to be respectful of Mr. Trump when he Is president, I will not listen in silence to hateful talk.  Silence is tacit approval”.

No doubting Thomas here!


He responded to a public situation he deemed to be intolerable.  Many I suspect would have kept their mouth shut or just left the bar altogether.  Sadly, hundreds of acts of hate have occurred in the 42 days since the Election. Thankfully the man I showcased in this post, just there eating dinner and watching TV in the Southern bar, chose to speak up – on behalf of the bar workers who were hearing the Trump enthusiasts that night.  My friend, in the presence of all of them, stood up to one of them directly – a loud, vulgar man running his big mouth.

  • My friend Thomas knew what was right and what he believed and didn’t hesitate to act on these beliefs. How would you have responded?
  • The twins of Love and Kindness can do a lot to offset Hate.
  • Sometimes people, be they morally-grounded people or abiding Christians, need to make split-second decisions to stand up against injustice. Some choose to speak up and assist; others choose to avoid. The words of Desmond Tutu, about the impact on justice of one’s neutrality, and the fearless Boston man whose story I’ve shared, “Silence is tacit approval”, are both powerful food for thought.  In the next post in this race relations series, more powerful words, from a gifted Episcopal Priest in the Boston MA area, will be featured. They speak to the role of one’s soul as a stronghold against hate and bigotry.

Greg Silverthorne

66 Assurance Way (12/20/16)


Photo credit: Via Tsuji/flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)